Articles about Moonrise Kingdom

Observations on film art : MOONRISE KINGDOM: Wes in Wonderland
Interesting
Category: Analysis
Tagged: Moonrise Kingdom, Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson has found a way to make films that project a unique sensibility while also fitting fairly smoothly into the modern American industry. He has his detractors ("I detest these films," a friend tells me), but there's no arguing with his distinctiveness.
Added by on 8/4/14
It isn't easy being twee: Why the Wes Anderson aesthetic is good for everyone
Interesting
Sure, mock "Portlandia," Wes Anderson, the Smiths. But Morrissey's right: It takes strength to be gentle and kind
Source: www.salon.com
Added by on 4/6/14
Video Essay: The Visual Themes of Wes Anderson Features, Video - Way Too Indie
Interesting
Wes Anderson has become a film genre. Even Saturday Night Live did a spoof on this notion, re-envisioning a modern horror film as a Wes Anderson comedy for one of their digital shorts. And although the auteur would not likely refer to himself as a "genre", the evidence is onscreen in every one of his films. It's through the marriage of his production design team's (David Wasco, Mark Friedberg, Nelson Lowry and Adam Stockhausen) signature art direction, and the virtuoso camerawork led by his go-to Director of Photography Robert Yeoman (as well as his stop-motion animation cinematographer Tristan Oliver) that Anderson has been able to carve a niche in American cinema history. In the same way a Spike Lee Joint or a Martin Scorsese Picture have their own distinctions, so also is a Wes Anderson film (more properly known as an American Empirical Picture) easy to spot. But the twist is, for all his towering success as an American auteur, the look and feeling behind each Anderson film finds its influences more rooted in foreign cinema. The tracking camera, moving from room to room, examining the bourgeoisie and upper class in the films of Luis Buñuel (e.g. El Angel Exterminador) laid the groundwork for the dolly and tracking shots in Anderson's Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums and early sections of The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou. The frenetic energy and overall zeal found in François Truffaut's Jules et Jim serves also as the celluloid backbone of most of Anderson's works, specifically Bottle Rocket, The Royal Tenenbaums, and Fantastic Mr. Fox. The melancholic swoons of the silver screen's longing romantics permeate Moonrise Kingdom, Hotel Chevalier/The Darjeeling Limited and in the romance subplot of Bottle Rocket. These films share the same sort of beautiful yet honest moments found in Jean-Luc Godard's Pierrot Le Fou.
Source: waytooindie.com
Added by on 2/18/14
Teenie Weenie Potty Mouths
Interesting
Video: A @NextMovie supercut of kids cursing in movies (NSFW, obviously)
Added by on 8/14/13
Cinema ticket prices: Should cost vary depending on the film? (Updated)
Interesting
Cinemas charge a flat rate for all films regardless of whether or not the film is a small independent or a massive studio production. Is this fair? @craigisonfire_ discusses whether it's time cinema chains priced their films by appeal.

From @on_QT
Added by on 7/2/13
Cinema ticket prices: Should cost vary depending on the film?
Interesting
Category: Analysis
Tagged: The Avengers, Moonrise Kingdom
Would lower ticket prices on smaller productions give them a better chance of appealing to a larger audience? Furthermore, could a film like Avengers Assemble afford to charge a little more for it's opening week and would people pay it?
Added by on 5/29/13
Sand and Deliver: 20 Great Beach Scenes
Interesting
Movies to put sand between your toes: Some for fun (''Beach Blanket Bingo,'' ''Some Like It Hot''), some with bite (''Jaws,'' ''The Seventh Seal'')
Source: www.ew.com
Added by on 3/23/13
Role Remix: Steve Buscemi
Interesting
Author @OwenKingwriter grouped together eight films - varying in quality from near-classic to the iffy, across genres and plucked from several different decades of cinema, where casting Steve Buscemi could've reaped major dividends.
Added by on 3/20/13
Oscar Fun Facts
Interesting
16 wonderfully geeky factoids from @filmdotcom to tell family and friends while watching the 2013 #Oscars
Source: www.film.com
Added by on 2/20/13
Scribes on their Scripts
Interesting
Highlights from the recent @akstanwyck writers' panel with David Magee, Stephen Chbosky, @rianjohnson and more
Added by on 2/12/13
Scribes on their Scripts
Interesting
Highlights from the recent @akstanwyck writers' panel with David Magee, Stephen Chbosky, @rianjohnson and more
Added by on 2/12/13
Observations on film art : MOONRISE KINGDOM: Wes in Wonderland
Interesting
Category: Analysis
Tagged: Moonrise Kingdom, Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson has found a way to make films that project a unique sensibility while also fitting fairly smoothly into the modern American industry. He has his detractors ("I detest these films," a friend tells me), but there's no arguing with his distinctiveness.
Added by on 8/4/14
It isn't easy being twee: Why the Wes Anderson aesthetic is good for everyone
Interesting
Sure, mock "Portlandia," Wes Anderson, the Smiths. But Morrissey's right: It takes strength to be gentle and kind
Source: www.salon.com
Added by on 4/6/14
Cinema ticket prices: Should cost vary depending on the film? (Updated)
Interesting
Cinemas charge a flat rate for all films regardless of whether or not the film is a small independent or a massive studio production. Is this fair? @craigisonfire_ discusses whether it's time cinema chains priced their films by appeal.

From @on_QT
Added by on 7/2/13
Cinema ticket prices: Should cost vary depending on the film?
Interesting
Category: Analysis
Tagged: The Avengers, Moonrise Kingdom
Would lower ticket prices on smaller productions give them a better chance of appealing to a larger audience? Furthermore, could a film like Avengers Assemble afford to charge a little more for it's opening week and would people pay it?
Added by on 5/29/13
Sand and Deliver: 20 Great Beach Scenes
Interesting
Movies to put sand between your toes: Some for fun (''Beach Blanket Bingo,'' ''Some Like It Hot''), some with bite (''Jaws,'' ''The Seventh Seal'')
Source: www.ew.com
Added by on 3/23/13
Role Remix: Steve Buscemi
Interesting
Author @OwenKingwriter grouped together eight films - varying in quality from near-classic to the iffy, across genres and plucked from several different decades of cinema, where casting Steve Buscemi could've reaped major dividends.
Added by on 3/20/13
Oscar Fun Facts
Interesting
16 wonderfully geeky factoids from @filmdotcom to tell family and friends while watching the 2013 #Oscars
Source: www.film.com
Added by on 2/20/13
Video Essay: The Visual Themes of Wes Anderson Features, Video - Way Too Indie
Interesting
Wes Anderson has become a film genre. Even Saturday Night Live did a spoof on this notion, re-envisioning a modern horror film as a Wes Anderson comedy for one of their digital shorts. And although the auteur would not likely refer to himself as a "genre", the evidence is onscreen in every one of his films. It's through the marriage of his production design team's (David Wasco, Mark Friedberg, Nelson Lowry and Adam Stockhausen) signature art direction, and the virtuoso camerawork led by his go-to Director of Photography Robert Yeoman (as well as his stop-motion animation cinematographer Tristan Oliver) that Anderson has been able to carve a niche in American cinema history. In the same way a Spike Lee Joint or a Martin Scorsese Picture have their own distinctions, so also is a Wes Anderson film (more properly known as an American Empirical Picture) easy to spot. But the twist is, for all his towering success as an American auteur, the look and feeling behind each Anderson film finds its influences more rooted in foreign cinema. The tracking camera, moving from room to room, examining the bourgeoisie and upper class in the films of Luis Buñuel (e.g. El Angel Exterminador) laid the groundwork for the dolly and tracking shots in Anderson's Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums and early sections of The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou. The frenetic energy and overall zeal found in François Truffaut's Jules et Jim serves also as the celluloid backbone of most of Anderson's works, specifically Bottle Rocket, The Royal Tenenbaums, and Fantastic Mr. Fox. The melancholic swoons of the silver screen's longing romantics permeate Moonrise Kingdom, Hotel Chevalier/The Darjeeling Limited and in the romance subplot of Bottle Rocket. These films share the same sort of beautiful yet honest moments found in Jean-Luc Godard's Pierrot Le Fou.
Source: waytooindie.com
Added by on 2/18/14
Teenie Weenie Potty Mouths
Interesting
Video: A @NextMovie supercut of kids cursing in movies (NSFW, obviously)
Added by on 8/14/13